1.THE POWER OF CULT BRANDS
by Kanwal Kapil (MDI-Gurgaon) and Sheeba Kapil (IIFT-Delhi)

Abstract:
We must recognize that brands don’t belong to marketers. Brands belong to the customer. Brands are spheres of influence, and the most magnetic brands win in the marketplace. Cult Brands are a special class of magnetic brands that command super-high customer loyalty and almost evangelical customers or followers who are devoted to them. In this paper we try to unveil the power of cult brands. Further then we try to discover the seven rules of cult branding. In the end the paper concludes with the discussion on world famous cult brands to uncover what actually made them attain that status. There are important learnings in this work, not only for academicians, but practitioners as well.
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2. LACK OF COORDINATION IN SUPPLY-CHAIN (BULLWHIP EFFECT) AND HOW TO CRACK IT?
by Rameshwar Dubey (UPES-Dehradun), Tripti Singh & Tanuj Nandan (both MNNIT-Allahabad)

Abstract:
The objective of this paper is to understand, broad view of “Lack of Coordination of Supply Chain (Bullwhip effect) and identifying the real culprit, the forecaster. If we go through the published articles and scholarly written research paper, it clearly reveals that the forecasting error is the root cause of the Bullwhip effect. The researchers aim to study various types of forecasting techniques covered under both subjective and quantitative methods, and intend to propose a best method to forecast with minimum error.Download Full Paper

3.HEALTHCARE SERVICES IN INDIA
by Maithili RP Singh & Rajinder Singh (both HSB, GJU-Hisar)

Abstract:
The healthcare system in India is as old as Indian civilization. During the British colonial rule Indian Indigenous system of medicine was neglected. However the state of neglect did not continue for a long time. The healthcare system today is significant business activities as healthcare organization make their decision about service line expansion on anticipated market growth and revenues. Since a long time there is a constant debate about the viability of specialized hospitals because setting up such hospital involves large fiscal outlay. The cost of providing hi-tech, diagnostic involve the purchase of modern technology, further high end surgical procedures, transplants have lead to the advent of corporate hospital single/ multi-specialty hospital. India is predicted to become a major health destination for the foreign patient in few years. Government and private hospitals are working hand in hand to attract the increasing number of patients from abroad, promoting tie up with foreign doctors, insurance providers and even foreign governments. India enjoys a unique position. Today most healthcare organizations are working on bringing down costs. Indian government classifying medical tourism as an industry and making it parts of the tourism plan. The major advantage of healthcare services in India is its cost effectiveness and competency along with the attraction of patients from abroad. India must leverage its competitive edge, especially its cost effectiveness and competency along with the attraction of patients from abroad. India’s healthcare services Industry is prepared to become a major driver of economic growth.
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4.EVALUATION FRAMEWORK FOR AN ERP SYSTEM USING BALANCED SCORECARD APPROACH
by Sudhanshu Joshi (GKU-Haridwar) and Manu Sharma (IFTM-Moradabad)

Abstract:
The overall purpose of this study is to explore whether BSC can be a better indicator to measure ERP system performance and how the initial objectives of ERP implementation affect the later ERP performance. In addition to this the study analyzes, the relations between financial and non-financial perspectives in an ERP Environment.Download Full Paper

5.RETAILING IN INDIA: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES
by JN Giri (Mangalmay-GNOIDA) and Ankit Sarin (SMS-Varanasi)

Abstract:
The Indian economy is integrating with the world, and yet it simultaneously has its own dynamics, which cushion global shocks as in no other country. It has been a long way since India embarked on an ambitious economic liberalisation programme. Over the last seven years, many of its fruitful benefits have manifested themselves and one of the areas where growth is clearly reflected is retailing. The retail scenario in India is unique. The latest pronouncements of Finance Minister P. Chidambaram about the sector have fuelled more interest in the segment. Favourable demographics, rising consumer incomes, real estate developments, especially the emergence of new shopping malls, availability of better sourcing options – both from within India and overseas – and changing lifestyle are the prime reasons that fuelled this boom. These factors have transformed hitherto savings-oriented and conservative Indian consumers and made them akin to those in developed markets.Download Full Paper

6.MUTUAL FUND INDUSTRY IN INDIA: RECENT TRENDS AND PROGRESS
by Anand Singh & CP Mall (both Faculty of Commerce, BHU-Varanasi)

Abstract:
Mutual Fund is an institutional arrangement wherein savings of millions of investors are pooled together for investment in a diversified portfolio of securities to spread risk and to ensure steady returns. These funds bring a wide variety of securities within the reach of the most modest of investors. It is essentially a mechanism of pooling together savings of large number of investors for collective investment with an approved objective of attractive yield and appreciation in value. The Mutual Funds offers different investment objectives such as growth, income and Tax planning. In the recent times the Indian Capital Market has witnessed new trends, one of them being the spectacular growth of Mutual Funds. There are more than 600 schemes offered by Mutual Funds, and these funds have mobilized substantial amount of the household savings. The present paper focuses on the growth of Mutual Fund Industry in India over the past few years.Download Full Paper

7.SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT: AN HR PERSPECTIVE
by DK Tripathi (LKEC-Ghaziabad)

Abstract:
Since earliest times producers have used their brands to distinguish their products. Modern branding and acquiring of individual brand names has its origin in the nineteenth century. In recent years brands have become very popular and familiar to the consumers. Brands are very important for the survival and success of a company. A brand must necessarily deliver value and the value must be defined in consumer terms. According to David Ogilvy, ‘Brands are a part of the fabric of life’. A brand has an existence that is greater than an actual product or service. A brand has a life of its own and feeds not only on the original product, but can also carry forward its values and identity into new product areas. According to Stephen King, ‘A product is something that is made in a factory; a brand is something that is bought by a consumer’ (1990.) Thus, a brand is a holistic combination of product and added values. Brand can be defined as a means of creating an identity for a product. It is the sum total of the particular satisfaction which it gives to the consumers who buy that specific brand. This sum total encompasses the name, ingredients, price, packaging, distribution, reputation and ultimately its performance. In fact today’s modern brand has outgrown from the mechanical aspects of product differentiation and has acquired a personality of its own. For example, brand Coca-cola.Download Full Paper

8.ALIENATION FROM WORK: A COMPARATIVE STUDY AMONG BUSINESS MANAGERS
by AK Mishra (Mizoram University, Aizawl)

Abstract:
In the present study attempt has been made to explore the effect of the nature of the job and sector of the organization in experiencing alienation causing factors like powerlessness,meaninglessness, normlessness, instrumental work orientation and self-evaluative involvement.To study the effect of the nature of the job on alienation causing factors data was collected from 100 service oriented and 100 production oriented managers.In order to study the effect of the sector of the organizations data was collected from 100 private and 100 public sector managers. ‘t’ test was used to analyse the data and a comparative account has been presented.Download Full Paper

9.COMMUNICATION AND CORPORATE-A MANAGERIAL APPROACH
by AK Mishra & Arnika Srivastava (both MGKV-Varanasi)

Abstract:
Communication is the process of transferring meanings. In a business setting this process sometimes accounts for the difference between success and failure and also profit and loss. This fact is now being recognized by both the corporate community and business schools. It is becoming clear to all the concerned parties that communication is critical to the effective functioning of modern business enterprises.Download Full Paper

10.ROLE OF DATA MINING AND ITS UTILITIES FOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE
by NS Fatima (Jaipuria-Ghaziabad)

Abstract:
In this paper we argue that data mining can make a significant contribution to knowledge management initiatives. We use two studies to show how data mining can make the difference during the knowledge management process. First, we describe how data mining was used as part of the knowledge management initiative in a major company. Currently, banks and other financial institutions are maintaining huge electronic data repositories. Valuable bits of information are embedded in these data repositories. The huge size of these data sources make it impossible for a human analyst to come up with interesting information that will helpful in the decision making process. Most of commercial enterprises have been quick to recognize the value of this concept, as a consequence of which the software market itself for data mining is expected to be in excess of 10 billion USD. In this note, I have discusses broad areas of application, like risk management, portfolio management, trading, customer profiling and customer care, where data mining techniques can be used in banks and other financial institutions to enhance their business performance. We demonstrate how implementation of data mining for generating new knowledge about credit risk improved the company performance. Secondly, we carry out a feasibility study of a knowledge management project in a major Finnish engineering company. We explore how data mining can improve the quality and responsiveness of reporting in corporate communications unit. The results of the studies allow us to conclude that data mining has strong functional capabilities to support knowledge management initiatives.Download Full Paper

11.A STUDY OF LIFE INSURANCE PERSPECTIVE IN VARANASI DIVISION
by Shahid Hussain & Manzoor Ahmad (both Faculty of Commerce, BHU-Varanasi)

Abstract:
Most of the Asian countries with the exception of Japan, South Korea and Taiwan have a low insurance penetration as compared to developed countries. India is an agricultural country. The earnings of many of our people are not enough for their livelihood. So they are unable to make investments in savings. They give priority to their food, medical attention and education. They think of savings for the future. The main aim of the most of the investors is to gain tax relief. So many people lack knowledge of the necessity of insurance. The Life Insurance Industry has come a long way since independence, and Indian consumers till recently had been dealing with only one life insurance player-the Life Insurance Corporation (LIC) in the public sector. After the liberalization of the insurance sector, more than a dozen companies have entered the business. This study attempts to assess the awareness of insurance in Varanasi Division and the level of investment.
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